From the Garage: Post 2: Breaking down wheel/hub for overhaul

The best thing about only having to work a half day in Michigan in December when the high is 30 and there are snow flurries and you’ve already done your trainer work out is??? You can work guilt free in the shop…:)

So today I decided to breakdown an old set of wheels that I personally bought in 1988. I bought the Campy Record Hubs and Wolber rims, took them to my LBS and said build me a set of wheels please.

These things have been around since and were a great knock around wheel for years. The hubs are in fantastic shape of course but the rims and spokes are ready to be replaced. So today I decided to tear them down.

With the front already apart I started simply loosening the nipples with a spoke wrench until the wheel fell apart.

Well actually it ALMOST fell apart:

After taking the spokes out I was just down to the hub itself, after 22 years it’s finally free again.

I’m showing the rear because it’s got slightly more parts. The front is basically the same or even easier.

First thing is to remove the locknut using the simple cone wrench:

One wrench on the flats of the cone and one on the locknut and loosen.

On the non-drive side from right to left is the locknut, a washer, a spacer, and then the cone.

The cone shape that gives the cone it’s name.

So unscrew all that stuff and then remove the axle from the other side being careful not to loose any bearings along the way.

Now simply use the wrenches in the same way to remove the locknut from the drive side.

So now we have from LEFT to right, the drive side locknut, drive side washer, the BIG drive side spacer, the drive side cone, the axel, the non drive cone, the non drive washer (oops slightly out of order there), the non drive (small) spacer and the non drive locknut.

I generally like to tie these things together just to be safe in case of dropping…:)

So, front hub, rear hub , and all the parts.

Next I’ll remove the bearings from the rear hub (they are already out of the front):

If your saying to yourself “man that grease looks really fresh!” It’s because it is. I rebuilt this hub only a few weeks ago before I decided to just take it off the rim. dohhh!! Oh well…

Now everything into the sonic cleaner basket (except the bearings)

And into the cleaner for 90 minutes with the heat on:

One last thing:

Just quickly measure the rear bearings: (I have those)

And the front bearings (I have those)

By checking these at this point It gives me the chance to go out and buy some tomorrow if I don’t have them instead of realizing right when I’m about to put the thing together that I don’t have them…:)

So this is pretty simple stuff that will get a little more difficult when I go to put this all back together and once that is done and the wheel is rebuilt and I do the hub adjustment, I’ll tie in the previous “from the garage” post and the quick release skewer pressure will become important!!!!!

I’m out
Scott

  • tonysarracino

    Are you using plain water in the ultrasonic cleaner?

  • will1

    Wow! Congratulations, I can honestly say that I could not have done that ride as I am at the moment, so good on you.

    I know that reading your posts, especially Part II reminded me a lot of the episode of Dhani Tackles The Globe where he goes to italy and rides in a Gran Fondo that includes a ride up Monte Grappa. Watching that episode really drives home just how hard it is to ride up a mountain like you did, here is a guy in peak physical shape (if you’re unfamiliar with him, he’s a linebacker in the NFL), with more power in his legs than I could ever hope for, and an incredible level of conditioning, and here he is, working his butt off on this mountain, trying to pedal past enough to keep his bike upright at times. You don’t get do be in the NFL without a ton of mental toughness, and it looked like he was dipping deep into his reserves for the climb. Your story of patience and focus reminded me a lot of that.

    So now you have something in common with an NFL linebacker — you’re both certified mountain goats!